ROSE

 

With an increase in traffic at the end of the 1880s, Sir Francis made the move to adopt steam traction and decided to build a new locomotive at Boot Lane. This choice was not as ambitious as it might first appear, most of the parts were outsourced to local engineers, and it’s questionable whether the engine was actually assembled at Boot Lane?

Designed by N.A. Dadd, ROSE was commissioned towards the end of 1882 and was, by all accounts an immediate success. The machine follows an extraordinarily simple design and like WINFRED, operates a railway with minimal demands.
A tall vertical boiler is carried on a rigid four-wheeled chassis, while the upright cylinders are mounted to the boiler. Water and coal are carried at either end of the locomotive, and a tall overall roof keeps the crew comfortable in all weathers.

Specifications ::
0-4-0 BT
Cylinders – 6″ x 9″
Driving wheels – 21″ (dia)
Boiler pressure – 140 psi
Tractive effort – 1620lbs (@75%bp)

Operational status –
In service


ROSE